Fasciculate

Fasciculate

With the term fasciculate, a word derived from the Latin fascicŭlus, meaning small bundle, in botany we mean an organ grouped as a bundle (for example, the flowers of the Judas tree) or other organs that have the same characteristics.
The term fasciculate can therefore refer to various anatomical parts. The following plant parts are defined as collated:
– of lateral roots, numerous and for the most part all having the same development, such as to equal the main one, thus simulating the main ones (syn. Homorrhizal root). These are typical of monocots.
– of roots characterized by the uniform development of numerous unbranched roots, starting from the same point. There is therefore no distinction of a main axis (or taproot) in which the secondary roots are inserted;
– of flowers gathered in bunches, starting from the same point (Cercis siliquastrum, L. 1758);
– linear leaves, very close together, gathered in bundles like a brush (Asparagus, Pinus);
– more or less vertical hairs, with more divisions arising from the base;
– of the thorns of many Cactaceae;
– of spikelets gathered in a bundle.




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