Embryophylls

Embryophylls

With the term embryophylls, a word coming from the medieval Latin embryo (n), in turn, derives from the Greek ἔἔμβρυον, composed of ἐἐν- “inside” and the theme of βρύω, and from the Greek word phýllon ‘leaf’, we mean, in botany the first leaves differentiated from the embryo (embryonic leaves), which in some cases come out of the ground carrying out the photosynthetic function (beech, pine), while in others (walnut, oak) they do not participate in the chlorophyll function or participate in it in a limited way ( bean) becoming reserve organs often remaining underground.
The embryophylls, or cotyledonary leaves, therefore perform the initial function of the young differentiated seedlings.
In grasses, the cotyledon is transformed into an organ (scutellum) which performs the function of secreting enzymes and absorbing nutrients from the seed.




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