Italian cities: one of the most polluted in Europe

Italian cities: one of the most polluted in Europe

In the panorama of environmental monitoring and the situation of our environment, sometimes a “more enjoyable” news even if the overall figure against the continental scenario is chill.
According to a recent CNR study on urban mobility in 2006-2016, the quality of air in the 14 metropolitan Italian cities improved during the study period. This data is especially important for nitrogen dioxide (NO2), but the limits of this and the fine dust are still frequent.
However, the news does not have to be easy enthusiastically, although although there is a widespread improvement in air quality, with a slight reduction in concentrations, metropolitan cities are still characterized by tightening limits for NO2 (biocide nitrogen) and fine PM10 and PM2.5 powders (these are the finest and most dangerous for the health).

 

From the data analyzed, it was found that this decrease in concentrations for NO2 occurs almost in all cities, for PM10 net for only some (Turin, Milan, Venice, Naples and Rome), for PM2.5 alone in Turin and Milan.
Sources of effort are still frequent; the NO2 over the years has overtakes for the cities of Rome, Turin, Florence, Milan, Genoa, Naples and Catania, while the PM10 have a number of overruns, except in a few cases, much higher than the limit for all cities in different anniversaries.
However, to understand how much Italy is back on the air quality objective, it is to be said that the high levels of air pollution in our country are the basis of two European Union infringement procedures. How to say that there is still a lot of work and political commitment in this direction.
Indeed, in the continental scenario, Italy is the most polluted air in the big European countries and with the largest number of deaths due to air pollution. It reveals a recent report presented to the Senate in Rome.
In this report we read that Italy has about 91,000 premature deaths per year for air pollution, against 86,000 in Germany, 54,000 in France, 50,000 in the United Kingdom, and 30,000 in Spain. Our country has an average of 1,500 premature deaths per year per polling per million inhabitants, against a European average of 1,000. Germany is at 1,100, France and the UK at about 800, Spain to 600.
According to this data, 91,000 deaths in Italy, 66,630, are for PM2,5, 21,040 nitrogen oxides (NO2), 3,380 for ozone (O3).
For PM2.5 thin powders, there are 1,116 premature deaths per year per million inhabitants per year, against a European average of 860. The area where the fine particulate kills more is the area of ​​Milan and the hinterland, then Naples , Taranto, the industrial area of ​​Priolo in Sicily, the industrial zones of Mantua, Modena, Ferrara, Venice, Padua, Treviso, Monfalcone, Trieste and Rome.
The most polluted zone from PM2.5 is the Po Valley, especially around Milan and between Venice and Padua. Then Naples, Taranto, Southeast Sicily, Frosinone, Benevento, Rome and the Arno Valley.
In short, the price of a non-viable lifestyle is very high but we still hear in our broadcasts and in the mass media the “beautiful” news that the resumption has begun or that the GDP is increasing by 0.000000 … .1%.
But if politics is often to blame for journalism what should we say?

Guido Bissanti




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